FUNtastic Summer Bucket List

What is a bucket list? It’s a list of achievements or experiences that a person hopes to accomplish during their lifetime or in this case, you want to explore during this summer. You can also empower your kids to make or plan their own fun! 🙂 Take a look at some of our favourite outdoor activities:

our summer bucket list 2018

*Have a picnic. * Go on a nature walk. * Fly a kite. * Build sandcastles. *Visit the library. * Go to a museum. * Bake cookies. * Ride a bike. * Visit a friend. * Plant a garden. * Play children games. * Go camping. * Make crafts. * Water gun fight. * Have a garden party. * Have a pyjama party. * Climb a tree. * Go hiking. * Blow bubbles. * Dance. * Look for bugs. * Be a tourist in your city. * Volunteer. * Go rock collecting and paint them. * Do a science experiment. * Play boardgames. * Have a homemade pizza party night. *Make and float paper boats. * Go to creative workshops. *Pool Day. * Have a No-Media day. *Go to the countryside. * Visit a farm. * Go to Yoga class Mom & Me

Prof. Ana-Maria Sulu

(Teacher Anne)

FB/Engleza MultiSensory

Reclame

Hello June, Happy Birthday, kids!

„Childhood is the most beautiful of all life’s seasons”

Let them PLAY!

Let them GET MESSY!

Let them EXPLORE!

Let them BE LITTLE!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, KIDS!

Childhoodhappy birthday

The Snowdrop Legend & Tradition

Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis) are one of the first bulbs to flower and signal the start of spring. The flower is a symbol of hope according to the following legend:snowdrop

The snowdrop became the symbol of hope when Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden. When Eve was about to give up hope that the cold winters would never end, an angel appeared. She transformed some of the snowflakes into snowdrop flowers, proving that the winters do eventually give way to the spring.

Another legend says: Long ago, on March 1st, a beautiful snowdrop, white and sweet, went out from under the snow in the forest. The winter wind saw him, flew into a rage and unleashed a storm of snow on the flower. The nice snowdrop bitten by the cold cried. The good fairy called Zana Primavara heard the flower sobbing and asked it : „Why are you crying? „I’m covered with snow and I’m dying of cold” said the snowdrop.  The fairy Primavara removed the snow on the flower.While she did that she hurt her finger against a small sharp stone hidden side of snowdrops. Her blood fell on the root of the flower, warmed, and the snowdrop came back to life. Another drop of blood fell on the petals became red .Immediately another snowdrops, white, uttered near her. „Thus the two inseparable bells, the red and white, became both the symbol of spring, love and hope Martisor called. snowdrop

Tradition:

Because of its flowering date, the snowdrop is the messenger of spring. The snowdrop is closely linked to Martisor/Martenitsa (March). This is the spring festival when the Martenitsa is celebrated on March 1st in countries such as Romania, Moldova and Bulgaria. Traditionally, men offer women a „Martenitsa”, a kind of talisman shaped brooch or pendant made of two twisted son, one red and one white. In Romania  everyone offer a” Martenitsa/ Martisor” on March,1st to their friends and family. Traditionally, you have to wear the Martenitsa on you (bracelet or necklace) until you see a stork then you can take it off and hang it up on a tree. This tradition  should bring luck into your life all along the year.

Interesting Facts

The name snowdrop does not mean ‘drop’ of snow, it means drop as in eardrop – the old word for earring.

Snowdrops are also known as known as ‘Candlemas bells‘.

The Latin name for the snow drop is Galanthus, which means „milk flower„.

Play to Learn – Engleza pentru copii!


Autumn leaves are falling down/
Children  playing on the ground

Making piles of  yellow leaves/Gathering  sweet  memories

Dragi parinti,

Din 06 septembrie,  copiii sunt asteptati sa ia parte la activitatile noastre desfasurate in limba engleza, prin participarea la cursul Play to Learn! Program: Marti & Joi de la 18:00

Invatam engleza prin activitati diverse si lejere:

  •  jocuri comunicative si activitati de socializare
  • proiecte individuale si de grup
  • teatru si jocuri de rol
  • lumea magica a povestilor
  • prezentari audio-video la fiecare lectie
  • arts & crafts
  • handwriting
  • tea/snack-break intre activitati

Alte activitati  si programe pentru 2012-2013:

 *Ateliere Educative, *Workshop-uri tematice, *Pregatire Examene Cambridge.

Inscrieri: 0757 525 372, office@englezadenota10.ro

Cu drag,

Echipa Englezadenota10

Kids Love English!

‘Tis the season to be Jolly!

„See the holidays through the eyes of a child. Remember your time as a child. Are we really that different? Wonder is not exclusive to children. The holidays are full of wonderment.” ~ Mark Toomey

 

May Joy and Happiness snow on You,

May the bells jingle for You

And may Santa be extra good to You!

Cambridge Club wishes you all these and more. Happy Holidays!

 

Happy Halloween!

Who’s that knocking on my door
I must admit I’m little scared,
I open it and what do I see,
A scary old witch and she’s laughing at me
Hee hee hee

Who’s that knocking at my door
I must admit I’m a little scared
I open it and what do I see
A green monster and he’s growling at me.
GRRRR

Now I’m walking out that door,
I’m not gonna be scared no more,
I’m in my costume and I’m ready to be
The one who’s scaring you
BOO!

The Origins of Halloween

Halloween is one of the oldest holidays with origins going back thousands of years. The holiday we know as Halloween has had many influences from many cultures over the centuries. The holiday originally comes from the Celts, who celebrated New Year on November the 1st and they had to store all the crops for a cold winter. For the Celts, winter was a dark time of year with fewer daylight hours. It was also a season associated with death. They believed that on the night of October 31, ghosts were able to come back to earth. The ghosts were not the friendly variety; instead, they came back to damage crops and torment the living. Since the barrier between the world of the living and that of the dead was thinner on October 31, this was the day when Celtic priests made predictions for the future.

Samhain” was the name of this autumn harvest festival.  Samhain means roughly in Old Irish “summer’s end,” and recognizes the fall harvest, and the separation of the end of the “lighter half” of the year from the beginning of the “darker half” of the year. November is the beginning of the “dark half” and is thus the beginning of half of the year, considered to be New Year’s Day for the Celts.

The Celtic priests were also known as the Druids, and they made Samhain a big event by lighting large bonfires. The Druids also dressed up in costumes that were made from animal heads and skins. When they were finished with the Samhain celebrations, the Celts re-lit the fires in their homes from the flames of those sacred bonfires. They thought it would help to keep them safe and warm all winter.

The Use of Costumes on Halloween

The use of masks and costumes was a practice of the Gaels who were mimicking the spirits in an attempt to quiet them. In Scotland young men wore masks, veils, or black painted faces while wearing white clothing. In the 19th and 20th centuries, children dressed in guises or costumes would go door to door seeking coins or treats.

Halloween Nowadays

Every late November, people in every house hang a least one ornament on their doors, to get in the spirit of the holiday. There are more than one ornamentation options and everybody decorates his house just as he pleases. The most “notorious” ornaments is the candle-pumpkin. It’s practically a pumpkin emptied on the inside and two eyes and a mouth are cut on its shell, and a candle is placed inside. Another way of decoration is the ghost and crown on the door. It’s a ghost standing in the middle of the crown made out of synthetic grass and small Halloween Pumpkins.

Trick or Treat

Another Halloween habit is trick-or-treating. It’s a game for the kids, they put on masks of ghosts, witches, zombies or scary monsters and go from door to door yelling out: Trick or Treat. It means that either you give them a treat or they play a trick on you. The most preferred treats are candy, chocolate or any other kinds of sweets and sometimes pumpkin pie and fruit salad.But no matter what they do, people always find a way to get into the spirit of the holiday, like everyone else should!

 

Five o’clock Tea

“Strange how a teapot can represent at the same time the comforts of solitude and the pleasures of company

In the past whether you took „afternoon tea” or „high tea” was a peek into your social standing.  Afternoon Tea was a light elegant meal served between a light lunch and late dinner, usually between 3 o’clock and 5 o’clock, and was mainly confined to the aristocracy with their leisurely lifestyle.  High Tea was a more substantial meal, including meat and/or fish, and was really an early dinner which well suited the middle and lower classes after a long day at work. 

Afternoon Tea’ did not exist before the 19th century.  At that time lunch was eaten quite early in the day and dinner wasn’t served until 8 or 9 o’clock at night.  But it wasn’t until Anna, the seventh Duchess of Bedford, asked for tea and light refreshments in her room one afternoon, around 1830, that the ritual began. 

The Duchess enjoyed her ‘taking of tea’ so much that she started inviting her friends to join her.  Before, long having elegant tea parties was very fashionable.  Demand for tea wares grew and soon there were tea services in silver and fine bone china, trays, cake stands, servers, tea caddies, tea strainers, teapots, and tea tables.

 So, the institution of tea connected with afternoon snack at four P.M. became widely known, this was postponed to five o’ clock in the 20th century.

Traditional five o’ clock tea is still held in the Buckingham Palace, as in countless English homes.

Have a tea! Have a cup of life!:)

%d blogeri au apreciat asta: